The Writer on Holiday

If, like me, a week away from your laptop and constant access to Twitter fills you with dread, here are some tips to appease your creative sensibilities while still getting some much-needed downtime. 1) Scribble on paper and then lock your notes in the safe A paper note can be a refreshing way to examine your ideas and help you make connections you might not have otherwise grasped. As for the safe, this is not because some would-be plagiarist might steal them (see Lucy V's post here), but because the maid might be disturbed by the carefully planned murder laid out on hotel stationery. 2) Mobile apps are your friend I drafted this post in the bar with a cocktail. Evernote, Celtx, Dropbox - make sure they're synced and ready to go. Also, take advantage of any hotel wifi for a quick glance at email (though I dutifully set my auto-responder) - it's particularly good if there's a time limit to the thing, for those...
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One to one-hundred-and-ten pages

I went on an excursion to Bristol to visit a friend. From Pads, it's about ninety minutes, so I left the laptop at home and took the hard drive (for TV catch-up) and the iPhone. I do my best writing on trains. But would that hold true without keys beneath my fingers and the ability to do more than one thing at a time? Turned out pretty well. I opened up my scripts in Celtx and fiddled about with them - the major downside was not being able to copy and paste long sequences, as I overhauled my final fight scene in Steampunk Assassins. I also looked up an old draft of the script using Dropbox to see if I still had an old scene that may get reworked into the finale sequence. The other project I worked on was my entry for the Laugh A Minute competition, which is inspired by Lucy V's call for sex. Unfortunately, nobody actually has sex, but...
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Plot on the go

Inspiration is unpredictable. And often inconvenient in timing. I've gone through phases on how I record my lightning-bolt moments. Until recently, I used to carry a notebook in my bag to scrawl down whatever came into my head - the "rewrite" of Steampunk Assassins took place on a train (naturally) with a bunch of papers tied together with red ribbon. When I was younger, I had a Dictaphone. I would write poetry and flash-fiction on it, record random plot ideas and sing songs into it. My co-writer and I once sat down all afternoon with it and recorded a lengthy discussion on how best to play out our magnum opus (as yet unwritten - ah, teen spirits!). I also had a mini-computer, which did me very well - until I tried to use in on a coach and it careered into the window, smashing the screen. My PDA was bought for work purposes but was also appropriated for plotting and writing. Now, I have...
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